Instinct & Intelligence

InstinctandIntelligence

::Fixed pattern response vs. the ability to adapt acquired knowledge to varied circumstances::

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Architecture in the Twentieth Century: Peter Gössel & Gabriele Leuthäuser

Architecture Book

A comprehensive guide to twentieth century architecture, beautiful large format photos and an expanse of information on architects and their work. I love dipping into this book. And, this edition has a beautiful cover design, lush colour and lines.

Non Human thought: Jaques Graven

Non Human Thought

Non Human Thought: Jaques Graven

This is such an interesting read about the psychology of animals, how they communicate, patterns, their social units, migration, memory and their relation to humans. I’ve always been interested in the behaviour of people, how we do things without realising because it is in our nature to do so, the way crowds move, body language, the subtle sense stimuli that we aren’t always aware of. Glances, scents, whispers.

Aside from the text, the design of this book is lovely, that classic Sci-Fi font and the Mothra attack splintered with fine blue lines. There is also a giant spider on the back in case that wasn’t disturbing enough.

Analog One

Analog One

Analog One – Science Fiction Compilation

Introduction: John W. Campbell
Monument: Lloyd Biggle,
The Plague: Teddy Keller
Remember The Alamo!: T.R. Fehrenbach
The Hunch: Christopher Anvil
Barnacle Bull: Winston P. Sanders
Join Our Gang?: Sterling E. Lanier
Sleight of Wit: Gordon Dickson
Prologue to an Analogue: Leigh Richmond

This is a great little collection of short stories from the 60’s. I love the typeface, similar modern fonts include Retroheavy, Bad Robot, Spaceship Bullet, Moon Monkey, JLS Space Gothic…I haven’t found this particular one yet…

 

Electric

Coventrylights

 

Doctor Greig chewed on his bic biro. His teeth marks peppered the end of the pen with white indentations, making the once translucent plastic mottled. As he stared down at the evidence, he shook his head. The doctor had seen this so many times before. A discovery that would shock society to the core. But as with all scientific experiments, his work was closely monitored by the government, and the note book would be locked away. Probably along with all of the scientists who had made the discovery before him. Grieg took the pen from his dry mouth, and wrote on the blue lined book ‘Electricity, with it’s ever increasing presence in our habitat, has started to numb the neurotransmitters in our brains. The noise is constant, and our brains are too tired to shout over the static.’